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Scuba diving can be a fun, revitalizing activity, but it also has potential health risks. As certified scuba divers, we’ve been taught what we should be doing before and after scuba diving, but it’s just as important to remember what we shouldn’t be doing after diving. In fact, this is not just for new divers, as many seasoned divers don’t know or remember these facts.

 

Planning a dive requires a great deal of preparation, along with numerous safety checks that you must complete beforehand. This process is explained and practiced many times during the PADI Open Water Diver certification. However, the safety considerations after your dive are not presented as a checklist, and many divers may not remember what not to do after scuba diving.

 

In this blog, we explore some key points on what to avoid after diving. Read on for 10 things you shouldn’t do immediately after your next underwater adventure!

1. Flying After Diving

Flying after scuba diving is one of the more widely known risks to divers. This issue comes up frequently in the diving world, because divers want to take full advantage of their vacations and also get the most diving time in while they can.

 

The main reason divers should avoid flying immediately after diving is the pressure inside the airplane’s cabin. The air pressure inside the cabin lessens as you reach altitude. When you’re flying in a plane right after diving, the increase in altitude results in a drop in pressure which is similar to a fast ascent while diving.

 

The longer and deeper you dive, the more nitrogen is absorbed into your blood and tissues. Upon returning to the surface, the ambient pressure reduces, and the nitrogen reverts to gas bubbles, which can be very dangerous when inside the body.

 

Decompression needs to be done slowly, so the nitrogen can safely pass back out through your lungs. If you ascend too quickly, the nitrogen can form bubbles in your blood or tissues, which can be painful and possibly fatal. The resulting condition is known as decompression sickness (or ‘the bends’).




 

Waiting the correct amount of time before flying will reduce the nitrogen in your body. As a general recommendation, leave a 24-hour surface interval before flying after doing any type of diving. This rule covers all types of dives and adds extra time as a safeguard for peace of mind.

 

Flying After Diving Guidelines from Divers Alert Network (DAN)

The following DAN guidelines apply to air dives followed by flights at cabin altitudes of 2,000 to 8,000 feet (610 to 2,438 meters) for divers who do not have symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS):

 

For a single no-decompression dive, wait at least 12 hours before flying

For multiple dives per day or multiple days of diving, wait at least 18 hours before flying

For dives requiring decompression stops, wait at least 24 hours before flying

In addition, you should wait longer if directed by the no-fly time indicated on your dive computer. To err on the side of safety, many divers plan a 24-hour surface interval before flying after any type of diving and spend this time resting or exploring topside attractions. However, keep reading to be aware of some other activities you should avoid doing straight after scuba diving.

2. Mountain Climbing or Driving

It may surprise you to discover that driving or hiking to the top of a 10,000-foot (3,048-meter) mountain puts you at the same risk for decompression sickness (DCS) as flying in an airplane. Cabin pressure in an average commercial jet is equivalent to being at 6,000 to 8,000 feet (1,800 to 2,400 meters) above sea level. If simulated altitude puts you at risk for DCS, being at altitude is also high risk. That said, people do dive at altitude and there are special dive tables to follow. This type of diving is called altitude diving.

 

You should avoid mountain climbing in the first 24 hours after a dive. If you are planning to combine mountain climbing and scuba diving on the same trip, go mountain climbing first to minimize any potential decompression sickness risk. It is better to go climbing before a dive, and this is an easy solution to reduce risk from a DCS perspective. Just be mindful of other factors that could affect your fitness to dive, such as exertion and fatigue so be sure to rest and hydrate after your climb or hike and before you go diving.

 

In the same way, if your journey home involves driving to altitude after diving, you should allow a sufficient surface interval to reduce the risk of decompression sickness (ideally 24 hours)—or choose an alternative route.

3. Ziplining After Diving

Ziplining as an activity is fine. Again, the concern is going to altitude after diving. It is recommended to confirm the altitude of your ziplining destination before you book.

 

Ziplining usually occurs on a mountain or elevated area and should be avoided for 24 hours after a dive due to the altitude. This helps reduce the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and enjoy your ziplining worry-free.

 

Other High-Altitude Activities to Avoid for 24+ Hours After Diving

Parachute jumping or skydiving

Paragliding

Parasailing

Skiing or snowboarding

Air ballooning

We always recommend reaching out to an individual who has more information about the destination and its altitude. The best thing to do is contact a local PADI Dive Shop and ask them about other activities that you can do safely after diving—such as local food, relaxation, or events.

3. Ziplining After Diving

Ziplining as an activity is fine. Again, the concern is going to altitude after diving. It is recommended to confirm the altitude of your ziplining destination before you book.

 

Ziplining usually occurs on a mountain or elevated area and should be avoided for 24 hours after a dive due to the altitude. This helps reduce the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and enjoy your ziplining worry-free.

 

Other High-Altitude Activities to Avoid for 24+ Hours After Diving

Parachute jumping or skydiving

Paragliding

Parasailing

Skiing or snowboarding

Air ballooning

We always recommend reaching out to an individual who has more information about the destination and its altitude. The best thing to do is contact a local PADI Dive Shop and ask them about other activities that you can do safely after diving—such as local food, relaxation, or events.

5. Relaxing in a Hot Tub or Shower

As the body warms up and circulation improves, there is also an increased chance of bubble formation. According to the Divers Alert Network (DAN):

 

“Since the solubility of gas is inversely related to temperature, tissues will hold less in solution as they warm. Warming tissues with significant gas loads can promote bubble formation.”

 

When you jump into a hot shower or hot tub straight after a dive—especially a colder dive—the warming up of tissues happens before blood flow increases. In this case, bubbles may form faster than the circulation can remove them harmlessly, creating a higher risk of decompression sickness.

 

The recommendations for reducing this risk are:

 

Wait 30 minutes before getting into a hot shower or hot tub to allow your body to warm up slowly

Lower the temperature of your shower or hot tub so your body doesn’t experience such a rapid increase in heat

6. Excessive Drinking

As you are well aware by now, your body requires some time to revert the nitrogen that was absorbed into the blood and tissues. Anything that interferes with the process of elimination of nitrogen from the body should be avoided. If you indulge in drinking alcohol, your body will begin to dehydrate faster—and dehydration increases the risk of decompression sickness (DCS).

 

Additionally, it becomes difficult to diagnose the symptoms of decompression sickness if you’ve been drinking after diving and are impaired. If you don’t identify symptoms quickly, DCS can be serious.

 

It’s best not to mix alcohol and scuba diving trips. But if you want to drink alcohol after diving, wait a few hours and hydrate prior.

7. Freediving After Scuba Diving

Dissolved nitrogen isn’t a major concern for casual snorkeling to very shallow depths. But, it is potentially a concern for freedivers who are also scuba divers. Your risk of decompression illness may increase if you freedive after scuba diving. According to the Divers Alert Network (DAN), this is for two reasons:

 

The physical exertion involved in freediving can increase bubble formation in your body

Bubbles already in your body from scuba diving can shrink under the water pressure and enter the arterial circulation

Depending on the depth and duration of your dives, you might want to enjoy a long surface interval before freediving after scuba diving. If you’re a scuba diver and a freediver, many in the freediving community recommend applying the flying after scuba diving guidelines:

 

After a single no-stop dive, wait 12 hours before freediving

After multiple no-stop dives or dives over several days, wait 18 hours

After a dive requiring a decompression stop, wait 24 hours

Wait longer if directed by the no-fly time of your dive computer

As a general rule, it is recommended to wait 24 hours before freediving after doing any type of diving. This rule covers all types of dives and adds extra time as a safeguard for peace of mind.

8. Exercising After Diving

Another important rule for scuba divers is to avoid exercise after diving. Physical exertion following scuba diving—particularly the kind that involves heavy use of muscles, joints, or rapid limb movement—could increase the formation of bubbles in the body, which can increase the risk of decompression sickness. Examples of exercise include:

 

Hitting the gym for weight training

Swimming or running after scuba diving

Playing sports, like beach volleyball or soccer

Even vigorous dancing!

According to the Divers Alert Network (DAN), the consensus among researchers is to wait at least 4-6 hours before exercising after scuba diving. Previously, this guidance was 24 hours, but that is now considered impractical. Of course (as with many other activities on this list), the longer interval you leave between diving and exercising, the less risk there will be of decompression sickness.

9. Skipping Your Surface Interval

Scuba is undoubtedly addictive. After surfacing from a dive where you’ve been surrounded by bucket-list marine life, like manta rays, sharks, or playful seals, it can be tempting to jump straight back in for a second dive (and a third, or fourth…).

 

However, your surface interval is non-negotiable. After a dive, you’ll still have nitrogen in your body, and it takes time for this to reduce enough for you to make another dive safely. How long you’ll need to wait depends on the depth and duration of the dive you’ve just completed—as well as the one you plan to do next. In every case, diving without the required surface interval increases your risk of decompression sickness.

 



Besides, taking a surface interval is the perfect opportunity to explore topside destinations, share stories with your dive buddies, and get some all-important rest and relaxation before your next div10. Ignoring Your Body

After diving, you should pay close attention to how you’re feeling and respond accordingly. Certain signs and symptoms can indicate a serious health issue, and you shouldn’t ignore them. For example, if you experience a rash, numbness, shortness of breath, or dizziness after a dive, you may have decompression sickness (DCS). If you’ve got ear pain after diving, this could be a sign of middle-ear barotrauma or an infection.

 

Some signs and symptoms of DCS can also be confused with other conditions. For example:

 

A red rash can look similar to sunburn

A headache after diving can feel like dehydration

Nausea can be a result of seasickness

Fatigue can be mistaken for simply feeling tired after a long day

There may well be nothing to worry about, and you just need to rest and rehydrate—but never ignore what your body is telling you. If something doesn’t feel right, talk to your dive buddy or dive guide, and consider seeking advice from a medical professional.

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The most common misconception regarding instructor training is the assumption that it comprehensively covers all necessary knowledge, which is inaccurate. Certain prerequisites are anticipated before attending the course, and although these vital elements are not directly taught, they are subject to evaluation.

Preparation is paramount in three primary areas for aspiring PADI SCUBA instructors. PADI, denoting the Professional Association of Diving Instructors, underscores the importance of professionalism. Hence, those undergoing professional training should act accordingly, ensuring thorough preparedness for the demanding course. The extent of preparation not only impacts performance and comprehension during training but also plays a substantial role in shaping one's identity as an instructor upon achieving certification.

 

Knowledge Development:

Upon official registration for the instructor course, the required PADI eLearning code for the IDC can be sent. Completing this eLearning before the IDC commencement is essential. It is crucial not to rush through this process, as the acquired information is applied throughout the PADI SCUBA instructor course. The accompanying digital Diving Knowledge Workbook builds upon the five areas of dive theory covered in Divemaster training—Physics, Physiology, Equipment, General Skills & Environment, and the Recreational Dive Planner. This knowledge base is expected to be mastered as a Divemaster and brought into SCUBA instructor training. Evaluation in this area occurs through exams, emphasizing the need for a solid theoretical foundation before attending the IDC. Achieving a level of comfort where one can explain the correctness of concepts is vital, considering that explaining concepts will be a crucial aspect of the instructor's role. Any uncertainties or specific questions must be addressed proactively to demonstrate a positive, professional attitude. While some clarification can be provided during the instructor course, a strong commitment level is essential for success.

 

Skill Practice:

General diving skills and comfort levels undergo continuous assessment during training. Therefore, having recent dive experience before participating in the PADI IDC is advisable. If access to a pool or confined water is available, rehearsing the updated PADI skill circuit is recommended. Merely performing the skill is insufficient; one must demonstrate each skill clearly, emphasizing slow and deliberate motions in key areas. A video guide is provided to assist in understanding the demonstration requirements. Alongside the 24 skills comprising the PADI skill circuit, re-familiarizing oneself with Rescue Diver training skills is a good idea, as these are integrated into the SCUBA instructor course. Some may even be assigned to teach during the IDC. A dedicated review of these skills, as highlighted in the knowledge section, contributes to overall development within the course.

 

PADI Material Familiarity:

A thorough understanding of the current version of the PADI instructor manual is crucial. Downloading it from the PADI pro account ensures access to the most up-to-date information, as standards may change routinely. The instructor manual is continuously used during dive instructor training course workshops, and knowledge of the manual is evaluated through exams. Adopting a habit of looking up information rather than assuming is encouraged. The manual is conveniently divided into small sections, making it easy to dedicate around 20 minutes per day to read through one section. This practice is beneficial, considering the expectation to reference the manual with relative ease. Beyond the PADI instructor manual, downloading the PADI app and exploring its features is recommended. Effective teaching scenario creation is part of SCUBA instructor training, and familiarity with digital products is expected. Acquainting oneself with the app is straightforward and offers excellent features.

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Adding to the world-class participant eLearning, Emergency First Response® (EFR®) announces the launch of EFR – Instructor Digital Crew Pak. The new crew pak will allow EFR Instructors around the world to deliver training using digital resources. The EFR – Instructor Digital Crew Pak now sits alongside the already released participant eLearning product available for Primary and Secondary Care, Care for Children, and AED & CPR. The code for this product is 60554-1 and is available from your Regional Training Consultant, or the eShop if you are a PADI® Member. The EFR – Instructor Digital Crew Pak will allow you access to the following items:

  • EFR Instructor eLearning

  • EFR Primary and Secondary Care Instructor Guide

  • EFR Care for Children Instructor Guide

  • EFR CPR/AED Instructor Guide

  • EFR Primary and Secondary Care eLearning

  • EFR Care for Children eLearning

  • EFR CPR/AED eLearning

  • EFR Primary and Secondary Care Video

  • EFR Care for Children Video

  • EFR CPR/AED Video

  • Emergency Care at a Glance Card

The languages available and the projected release dates are as follows:

English

3Q 2023

Arabic, Spanish, German, French, Korean, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese and Indonesian

4Q 2023

Dutch, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Thai

1Q 2024

Russian, Greek, Turkish, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish

2Q 2024

Alongside the digital materials, the physical packs will remain available to EFR Instructor candidates. The Training Bandage Pack, EFR Red Carry Bag, and decals will remain available to those who would like to order them either individually or as part of an Instructor Crew Pak. To place an order, please speak with your Regional Training Consultant. 

EFR Primary and Secondary Care Video Updated

The video in EFR Primary and Secondary Care eLearning has been updated to better reflect present ILCOR recommendations and international practice variations, as well as a more modern overall look. The updated footage was shot and edited to fit modern devices (wide-screen format) in an eLearning format using state-of-the-art, high-resolution, pro-level cameras (RED). This also improved the overall image quality compared to the older existing video. Already in place in English, it will be updated for other languages as translations become available.

United States Coast Guard Renews EFR Recognition

Soon after Emergency First Response Corp. released the Primary and Secondary Care program in 2002, the United States Coast Guard (USCG) approved it to meet the first aid and CPR requirement for the USCG Merchant Mariner licensure. To maintain this approval, the USCG requires a program review every five years. The result of this re-evaluation extended USCG approval of EFR Primary and Secondary Care courses another five years – until 31 May 2028.

To meet USCG Merchant Mariner licensure requirements, Primary and Secondary Care training needs to be completed within one year of merchant mariner application. The student must be issued a certificate of training containing the following information:

  • Name and code of the course as First Aid & CPR (Emergency First Response – Primary and Secondary, code: EMERFR-197)

  • Name of the educational institution (Emergency First Response)

  • Date of completion and location where the training was conducted

  • Name of the student

  • Signature of an authorized representative of the school (instructor’s signature)

EFR Certificates (Product No. 40021) may be ordered through your local EFR Office to meet this need. EFR Instructors can take advantage of this approval by actively reaching out to those seeking CPR and first-aid training to meet USCG licensure requirements. For questions, contact your Regional Training Consultant.

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